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A. Glover

AP Physics 1

AP Physics 1

Course Syllabus

 

 Course Title:

 

AP Physics 1

 Teacher:

 

Mr. Glover

 Contact Information:

 

aglover@lbschools.net

(562)425-1281 

 Class Location:

 

700 Building, Room 715

 Class Schedule:

 

Check your schedule of classes

 Course Credit:

 

5 Credits per Semester, 10 Credits per Course

 Course Hours:

 

2 Semesters, 180 Hours

 Grades:

 

11 and 12

  Prerequisite

Algebra 2 with  C or better, or consent of teacher

  Conference Period

3rd and 8th Periods

  Tutoring  Sessions

Before school starts (7:10 am), Lunch breaks

                  

The objective of this course is to give students a thorough understanding of the basic concepts of physics from mechanics to modern physics and the ability to apply the fundamental principles to a wide variety of situations. Peer-coaching, peer-teaching and peer-review will be part of our course. Course goals also include developing each student’s intuition, creativity and investigative skills to do the following:

  • Read, understand, and interpret physical information
  • Describe and explain the analysis of a particular physical phenomenon or problem.
  • Use basic mathematical reasoning in a physical situation or problem.
  • Perform experiments, interpret and communicate the results of observations.

 

In doing this, students will also discover how useful and relevant physics is to their lives by completing hands on student directed laboratory investigations. In addition, an emphasis on problem solving techniques will be addressed through instruction, labs and online interactive concept developing and problem solving sites.

 

Textbook:

 “College Physics” Knight, Jones, Field 3rd Edition, Pearson

 

Grading:

The students will be graded on a standard scale.

à 85 - 100%          

à 75 – 84%                 

à 65 – 74%             

à 55 – 64%

 The grades will be broken down and calculated on the following matrix:

Homework                                    10% of total grade

Lab Write-ups                               20% of total grade

Quizzes                                        10% of total grade

Tests                                             60% of total grade

 

Homework

These assignments are designed to reinforce the conceptual and physical relationships taught in class. Students should plan on at least half an hour of homework time after each class meeting. We start each day’s class by looking at the reasoning strategies used in solving problems. Homework will be assigned about two times a week from the end of chapter problems. The solution’s manual will be available to you to check your work before turning them in. In addition a set of multiple choice questions will be assigned covering the chapter concepts being taught. Late homework is accepted at a 20% deduction of points the day following the due date only.

 

Quizzes

Each unit will include one or two quizzes worth 10 points.  Quizzes are designed to help the student keep pace with what is happening in the class at this time.  A student who scores poorly on a quiz should take that as a sign that more work is needed.

 

Labs

There will be a lab activity to help students understand the topics being taught worth 30 points each. Most of the lab experiments are guided inquiries: The students are given an objective and a list of equipment, working in pairs, they design their own experiment and in their lab notebooks describing their procedure, gathered data, and their analysis of the data, including identifying sources of error, determine the uncertainties in measurement, and suggesting ways to improve experiments. Each student must demonstrate the knowledge of lab safety rules and procedures and also the proper use and application of the instruments and apparatuses used in experiments.

 

Exams

After every unit there will be an exam worth 100 points.  The exam will be formatted to match the advanced placement exam with some of the questions being in multiple choice format and others being free response.

 

Extended Studies

Because the A.P. Exam is given in May, there is about one month of time left over in the class after the exam.  This time will be used for studies of topics in Modern Physics. 

 

Units of Study

The following topics will be covered this year in preparation of the Advanced Placement Physics 1 Exam. Each topic will include an opening conceptual lecture, a series of demonstration problems, practice problems to be done in class and homework to reinforce both the concepts and the problem solving skills needed to pass the exam.  Each unit will feature lab activities that will require students to apply their knowledge of both the concepts and the problem solving.  Each topic is meant to take up 2 to 3 weeks of class time.

 

Course Outline:

Kinematics

Dynamics

Circular Motion and Gravitation

Energy

Momentum

Simple Harmonic Moton

Rotational Motion

Mechanical Waves

Electrostatic

DC Circuits

Mechanical Robotic Programming

 

COURSE OVERVIEW:

The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the key concepts underlying mechanical programming and classical physics in a 'learn by doing' environment. This physics-based programming course will introduce both engineering design and scientific methods, utilize inquiry based laborites and require students to embrace abstract thought that can be utilized in real world problem solving.  Students will also hone information and communication technology skills by programming robots and furthering their expertise in software, hardware and networking.

           

The overall method of learning is through the application and development of robotics and engineering projects. This innovative, high-tech curriculum utilizes the VEX Robotics equipment as a tool for hands-on, project-based learning. Building, developing, testing and performing labs with VEX equipment is designed to introduce students to the key concepts in physics while nurturing an atmosphere of teamwork, cooperation, and the need for technical knowledge and expertise. This course allows students to explore and learn practical, future work skills that can be of great benefit to their future endeavors while also mastering the fundamental concepts and applied mathematics involved in the NGSS Science standards.

 

Textbook:  “Physics” Authors: Serway & Faughn, Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt

 

Grading: You will be graded on the following scale.

A à 85 - 100%        

B à 75 – 84%            

C à 65 – 74%                       

D à 55 – 64%

 

The grades will be broken down and calculated on the following matrix:

Assignments                                    60% of total grade

Notebooks                                       10% of total grade

Participation/Teamwork                    20% of total grade

Labs                                                  10% of total grade

 

Assignments

60% of the students overall points will be on the physical concepts learned in class and the ability to build, program and perform tasks with their robot. Any unexcused absence on a test day will result in a score of zero. Any absence not “cleared” within a week will be recorded as an unexcused absence and this status cannot be changed. An absence the day before the test does not excuse you from taking the test if you return on test day.

 

Notebooks

The students' programming codes for each assignment and lab reports are submitted through Google classroom. Late works are accepted at a 20% deduction of points within 2 days of the due date.

 

Participation/Teamwork

The students will work with a partner. Each student will be given points for their level of contribution to the success of the team. Students are responsible for their robot and the robot parts. 

 

Labs

Lab assignments are designed to reinforce the conceptual and physical relationships taught in class. Some of the labs will be done using robots. 

 

 

Mr. Glover

Course Syllabus

 

 Course Title:

 

Physics 1 2

 Teacher:

 

Mr. Glover

 Contact Information:

 

aglover@lbschools.net

(562)425-1281 

 Class Location:

 

700 Building, Room 715

 Class Schedule:

 

Check your schedule of classes

 Course Credit:

 

5 Credits per Semester, 10 Credits per Course

 Course Hours:

 

2 Semesters, 180 Hours

 Grades:

 

11 and 12

  Prerequisite

Algebra 1 with  C or better, or consent of teacher

  Conference Period

3rd  and 8th Periods

  Tutoring  Sessions

Before school starts (7:10 am) Lunch breaks

 

The objective of this course is to give students a fundamental understanding of the basic concepts of physics from mechanics to modern physics and the ability to apply the fundamental principles to a wide variety of situations. Peer-coaching, peer-teaching and peer-review will be part of our course. Course goals also include developing each student’s intuition, creativity and investigative skills to do the following:

  • Read, understand, and interpret physical information
  • Describe and explain the analysis of a particular physical phenomenon or problem.
  • Use basic mathematical reasoning in a physical situation or problem.
  • Perform experiments, interpret and communicate the results of observations.

 In doing this, students will also discover how useful and relevant physics is to their lives by completing hands on laboratory investigations. In addition, an emphasis on problem solving techniques will be addressed through instruction, labs and online interactive concept developing and problem solving sites.

 

Textbook:

 “Physics, Principles and Problems”, Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

 

Grading:

The students will be graded on a standard scale.

A à 85 - 100%   B à 75 – 84%  C à 65 – 74%  D à 55 – 64%

 

The grades will be broken down and calculated on the following matrix:

Homework                                                       10% of total grade

Lab Write-ups                                                   20% of total grade

Quizzes                                                             10% of total grade

Tests                                                                   60% of total grade

 

                                                                                     

 Homework

These assignments are designed to reinforce the conceptual and physical relationships taught in class. Students should plan on at least half an hour of homework and study time after each class meeting. We start each day’s class by looking at the reasoning strategies used in solving problems. Homework will be assigned about two times a week from the end of chapter problems.. In addition a set of multiple choice questions will be assigned covering the chapter concepts being taught. Late homework is accepted at a 20% deduction of points the day following the due date only.

 

Quizzes

Each unit will include one or two quizzes worth 10 points.  Quizzes are designed to help the student keep pace with what is happening in the class at this time.  A student who scores poorly on a quiz should take that as a sign that more work is needed.

 

Labs

There will be a lab activity to help students understand the topics being taught worth 30 points each. Most of the lab experiments are guided inquiries: The students are given an objective and a list of equipment, working in pairs, they design their own experiment and in their lab notebooks describing their procedure, gathered data, and their analysis of the data, including identifying sources of error, determine the uncertainties in measurement, and suggesting ways to improve experiments. Each student must demonstrate the knowledge of lab safety rules and procedures and also the proper use and application of the instruments and apparatuses used in experiments.

 

Exams

After every unit there will be an exam worth 100 points.  The exam will be formatted to match the advanced placement exam with some of the questions being in multiple choice format and others being free response.

  

Units of Study

Each topic will include an opening conceptual lecture, a series of demonstration problems, practice problems to be done in class and homework to reinforce both the concepts and the problem solving skills needed to pass the exam.  Each unit will feature lab activities that will require students to apply their knowledge of both the concepts and the problem solving.  Each topic is meant to take up 2 to 3 weeks of class time.

 

Course Outline:

Kinematics and Newton’s Laws

Rotational Motion

Work and Energy

Mechanical Waves and Sound

Mirrors and Lenses

Electricity and Magnetism

Modern Physics

 

Mr. Glover

A. Glover Locker